AFRICA REGION

GCF Watch – AFRICA

The climate struggles of our communities in Africa are not only impacting on livelihoods but also the economies of our countries. Within such a reality, climate finance is a necessity, required to make a difference and cause transformation in African  peoples’ lives by enhancing resilience and ensuring a low carbon development pathway. The Green Climate Fund is mandated to provide finance to developing countries. Engaging this fund at country and global levels is critical for African civil society to ensure that the communities benefit from transformative, impactful and sustainable projects. It is with great conviction that that this website will provide the engagement space for people in Africa on the GCF and share with the world stories of change resulting from GCF financing.

— Julius Karanja Mbatia

Africa Resources

Preparing African civil society actors to engage with the Green Climate Fund

Africa is one of the regions the most affected by the adverse impacts of climate change. The continent regularly experiences humanitarian crises from deadly water scarcity, floods and severe droughts, with this sometimes resulting in permanent conflicts between communities living near the only water sources available. Since the 1970s, the Lake Chad – one of the main water resources of the continent – leaves thousands of families without solution for their daily access to ‘’clean’’ water, which is a basic human right. This is just one example among many others, and the key findings of the October 2018’s IPCC Special Report on 1.5 degrees does not give any security to the continent’s population which needs more than ever before to become better resilient to the threat.

 

Green Climate Fund Readiness and Preparatory Support Programme – a Factsheet for Civil Society

The Green Climate Fund (GCF) recognizes the importance of stakeholder input and participation in the design, development and implementation of its financed strategies and activities to reduce CO₂ emissions and support developing countries that are vulnerable to the effects of climate change. Despite some existing challenges, these stakeholders, including private sector actors, civil society organizations (CSOs), vulnerable groups, women and indigenous peoples, can engage in the GCF at various levels.

Prepared for use in particular by civil society, this factsheet provides clear information about which engagement opportunities exist at the national, regional and international levels for CSOs in the GCF. It enhances understanding on how to interact with the Fund’s Board, its Secretariat, and other relevant actors involved in the implementation of its financed activities. Furthermore, it describes which specific roles civil society can play in order to have a meaningful impact when they engage in planning, implementing, monitoring and evaluating activities, projects and programmes funded by the GCF. The publication ends by emphasizing a number of the Fund’s policies and guidelines, which are pertinent for civil society’s readiness.

The factsheet is published under the project “CSOs readiness to the GCF – focus Africa” jointly implemented by Germanwatch and CARE International with support from a consortium of African networks and civil society organizations. The project aims to support broader African civil society engagement in the critical early implementation phase of the GCF. Objectives include developing readiness materials which facilitate CSO understanding and engagement, supporting CSO engagement with the Fund in key African countries (with a focus on Ghana, Kenya, Malawi, Morocco, and Senegal), and sharing experiences at regional and global scales for expanded CSO engagement in Africa and beyond.

 

Case Study (Ghana): Why Government granted us GCF observer rights

Being at the table when governments prepare decisions in relation to how they approach the Green Climate Fund (GCF) domestically is important for civil society to play a meaningful role as dialogue partner. As part of a multi-country project advancing civil society readiness to the GCF with a particular focus on Africa, civil society organisations in Ghana have been actively engaging in the national debates on the GCF.

In 2017, the SDG13 platform demanded from Government that CSOs be granted observer rights in the country’s cross-ministerial Technical Advisory Committee. Eventually, Government acceded to our demands – and more. But why did we succeed?

 

Green Climate Fund Readiness and Preparatory Support Programme – a Factsheet for Civil Society

Developing countries that are vulnerable to the effects of climate change and/or plan activities to reduce CO₂ emissions can access resources from the Green Climate Fund (GCF). The Fund has established the Readiness and Preparatory Support Programme which is meant to promote country ownership. Since its operationalization in 2014, the Programme has been providing early support activities to enhance ownership and enable access to the GCF resources.

This factsheet is made for civil society and aims to enhance their understanding of the GCF’s Readiness and Preparatory Support Programme. It provides a clear explanation of which activities are supported, how much funding is available and how to access these resources in order to strengthen countries’ engagement with the Fund as well as maximize the impacts of funded projects or programmes locally.

The factsheet is published under the project “Civil Society Organizations readiness to the Green Climate Fund – focus Africa” jointly implemented by Germanwatch and CARE International with support from a consortium of African networks and civil society organizations. The project aims to support broader African civil society engagement in the critical early implementation phase of the GCF. Objectives include developing readiness materials which facilitate CSOs understanding and engagement; supporting CSOs engagement with the Fund in key African countries (with a focus on Ghana, Kenya, Morocco, Malawi and Senegal), and sharing experiences at regional and global scales for expanded CSOs engagement in Africa and beyond.

 

About Africa GCFWatch

The climate struggles of our communities in Africa are not only impacting on livelihoods but also the economies of our countries. Within such a reality, climate finance is a necessity, required to make a difference and cause transformation in African  peoples’ lives by enhancing resilience and ensuring a low carbon development pathway. The Green Climate Fund is mandated to provide finance to developing countries. Engaging this fund at country and global levels is critical for African civil society to ensure that the communities benefit from transformative, impactful and sustainable projects. It is with great conviction that that this website will provide the engagement space for people in Africa on the GCF and share with the world stories of change resulting from GCF financing.

— Julius Karanja Mbatia

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Africa Resources

Preparing African civil society actors to engage with the Green Climate Fund

Africa is one of the regions the most affected by the adverse impacts of climate change. The continent regularly experiences humanitarian crises from deadly water scarcity, floods and severe droughts, with this sometimes resulting in permanent conflicts between communities living near the only water sources available. Since the 1970s, the Lake Chad – one of the main water resources of the continent – leaves thousands of families without solution for their daily access to ‘’clean’’ water, which is a basic human right. This is just one example among many others, and the key findings of the October 2018’s IPCC Special Report on 1.5 degrees does not give any security to the continent’s population which needs more than ever before to become better resilient to the threat.

 

Green Climate Fund Readiness and Preparatory Support Programme – a Factsheet for Civil Society

The Green Climate Fund (GCF) recognizes the importance of stakeholder input and participation in the design, development and implementation of its financed strategies and activities to reduce CO₂ emissions and support developing countries that are vulnerable to the effects of climate change. Despite some existing challenges, these stakeholders, including private sector actors, civil society organizations (CSOs), vulnerable groups, women and indigenous peoples, can engage in the GCF at various levels.

Prepared for use in particular by civil society, this factsheet provides clear information about which engagement opportunities exist at the national, regional and international levels for CSOs in the GCF. It enhances understanding on how to interact with the Fund’s Board, its Secretariat, and other relevant actors involved in the implementation of its financed activities. Furthermore, it describes which specific roles civil society can play in order to have a meaningful impact when they engage in planning, implementing, monitoring and evaluating activities, projects and programmes funded by the GCF. The publication ends by emphasizing a number of the Fund’s policies and guidelines, which are pertinent for civil society’s readiness.

The factsheet is published under the project “CSOs readiness to the GCF – focus Africa” jointly implemented by Germanwatch and CARE International with support from a consortium of African networks and civil society organizations. The project aims to support broader African civil society engagement in the critical early implementation phase of the GCF. Objectives include developing readiness materials which facilitate CSO understanding and engagement, supporting CSO engagement with the Fund in key African countries (with a focus on Ghana, Kenya, Malawi, Morocco, and Senegal), and sharing experiences at regional and global scales for expanded CSO engagement in Africa and beyond.

 

Case Study (Ghana): Why Government granted us GCF observer rights

Being at the table when governments prepare decisions in relation to how they approach the Green Climate Fund (GCF) domestically is important for civil society to play a meaningful role as dialogue partner. As part of a multi-country project advancing civil society readiness to the GCF with a particular focus on Africa, civil society organisations in Ghana have been actively engaging in the national debates on the GCF.

In 2017, the SDG13 platform demanded from Government that CSOs be granted observer rights in the country’s cross-ministerial Technical Advisory Committee. Eventually, Government acceded to our demands – and more. But why did we succeed?

 

Green Climate Fund Readiness and Preparatory Support Programme – a Factsheet for Civil Society

Developing countries that are vulnerable to the effects of climate change and/or plan activities to reduce CO₂ emissions can access resources from the Green Climate Fund (GCF). The Fund has established the Readiness and Preparatory Support Programme which is meant to promote country ownership. Since its operationalization in 2014, the Programme has been providing early support activities to enhance ownership and enable access to the GCF resources.

This factsheet is made for civil society and aims to enhance their understanding of the GCF’s Readiness and Preparatory Support Programme. It provides a clear explanation of which activities are supported, how much funding is available and how to access these resources in order to strengthen countries’ engagement with the Fund as well as maximize the impacts of funded projects or programmes locally.

The factsheet is published under the project “Civil Society Organizations readiness to the Green Climate Fund – focus Africa” jointly implemented by Germanwatch and CARE International with support from a consortium of African networks and civil society organizations. The project aims to support broader African civil society engagement in the critical early implementation phase of the GCF. Objectives include developing readiness materials which facilitate CSOs understanding and engagement; supporting CSOs engagement with the Fund in key African countries (with a focus on Ghana, Kenya, Morocco, Malawi and Senegal), and sharing experiences at regional and global scales for expanded CSOs engagement in Africa and beyond.

 

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