Resources

Downloadable resources:

Notes on the Recent GCF Global Programming Conference 2019 (via Facebook Live)
Factsheet: Civil Society Readiness to the Green Climate Fund – Focus Africa
Factsheet: Readiness support is key to accessing Green Climate Fund in Malawi
Local actors ready to act: Six proposals to improve their access to the Green Climate Fund
Engaging with the Green Climate Fund – A Civil Society Toolkit (Germanwatch)
Briefing Paper | Participatory Monitoring & Evaluation in the Green Climate Fund – And How Civil Society Can Engage
Innovative Finance Sources | A Complement to Strong Country Contributions for GCF Replenishment?
CSO Comments on Strategic Programming Prepared for First Replenishment Consultation Meeting in Oslo, Norway, April 4-5, 2019
CSO Comments on Updated Sexual Exploitation, Sexual Abuse, and Sexual Harassment Policy Draft
Indigenous Peoples Policy
CSO Update 3: Green Climate Fund Board Meeting 22
CSO Update 2: Green Climate Fund Board Meeting 22
CSO Update 1: Green Climate Fund Board Meeting 22
Factsheet for Civil Society : Civil Society Engagement with the Green Climate Fund (English & French)
Factsheet for Civil Society : Green Climate Fund Readiness and Preparatory Support Programme (English & French)
Case Study (Ghana): Why Government granted us GCF observer rights
Green Climate Fund: The Basics
Green Climate Fund: The Private Sector
Green Climate Fund: In Your Country
Green Climate Fund: How Fund is Decided
Green Climate Fund: Right and Equity
Green Climate Fund: Right and Equity
Notes on the Recent GCF Global Programming Conference 2019 (via Facebook Live)

This meeting report was based on conference sessions that were streamed through Facebook Live.

Factsheet: Readiness support is key to accessing Green Climate Fund in Malawi

Climate change and its impacts have serious worldwide implications on socio-economic development especially for Least Developed Countries (LDCs) such as Malawi. In response, Malawi has prioritized climate change in its development agenda. Cognizant that effective response to climate change challenge requires collective action from all countries, advanced economies unanimously agreed to jointly mobilize significant financial resources for addressing the pressing mitigation and adaptation needs of developing countries like Malawi under a fund called the Green Climate Fund. Civil Society Network on Climate (CISONECC) in collaboration with CARE International in Malawi, CARE DL and German Watch is implementing the GCF-CSO Readiness project in Malawi whose objective is to strengthen the engagement of civil society actors and organizations in the GCF processes at national, regional and international level and scale-up existing CSOs’ capacities as well as to ensure accountability of GCF-funded activities by national authorities through a broader societal mobilization for transformation and better impacts.

Local actors ready to act: Six proposals to improve their access to the Green Climate Fund

Local initiatives help people – and the environment on which their livelihoods depend – to adapt to climate shocks and changes. Unfortunately, local climate action is grossly underfunded. The vast majority of climate finance tends to be channelled to large financial institutions focusing on large-scale projects that do not necessarily build upon or support – and often even counteract — local efforts. The role of local actors in climate finance decision-making processes is often very limited.

Several solutions have been or are being proposed to increase access of local actors to climate funds, and ensure accessible, gender-responsive climate finance decision-making processes. Six specific proposals are described in this concise booklet, focusing on the Green Climate Fund (GCF)and including concrete recommendations for the GCF Board, Secretariat, and other relevant decision-makers. The booklet is meant to stimulate more and deeper debate on the crucial role local actors play in the transformative change needed to deal with global climate change.

Engaging with the Green Climate Fund – A Civil Society Toolkit (Germanwatch)

The Green Climate Fund (GCF) was created to serve as one of the primary funding institutions of the international climate finance architecture under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and the Paris Agreement. Its overall goal is to promote the “paradigm shift towards low-emission and climate-resilient development pathways’’ by providing support to developing countries, specifically those that are particularly vulnerable to the adverse impacts of climate change, to limit or reduce their greenhouse gas emissions and to adapt of global warming effects. With a portfolio of over hundred projects and programmes across developing countries, the GCF is expected to reduce more than 1.5 billion tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent of greenhouse gases and to improve the life of over 276 million (direct and indirect) beneficiaries across 97 countries.

The Governing Instrument of the GCF, in paragraph 71, recognises the importance of stakeholder input and participation. It requests the board of the fund to develop mechanisms to promote the participation of broad stakeholders in the design, development and implementation of strategies as well as activities financed by the fund. Amongst them private sector actors, civil society organisations, vulnerable groups, women and indigenous peoples and communities.

Therefore, encouraging as well as building civil society readiness for the GCF has emerged as a necessary step in contributing to a successful fund. This toolkit aims to provide civil society actors and their organisations, as well as any other stakeholders interested in the GCF, with relevant information, deeper knowledge, and guidance on how to get involved with the fund. By providing an overview of the GCF and possibilities for CSO engagement, the publication introduces the key structures and policies of the fund and the functioning of project and programme, from their inception and development to their implementation and monitoring. An emphasis on the practicality und concrete usefulness of the toolkit is illustrated through a number of case study examples as well as useful tools, which illustrate civil society roles and provide hands-on approaches on their meaningful engagement with the GCF.

The toolkit is published under the project “CSO readiness for the GCF – focus Africa”, supported by the German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety and implemented by Germanwatch and CARE with support from PACJA (Kenya), Enda Energie (Senegal), CISONECC (Malawi), AESVT (Morocco), and Kasa Initiative (Ghana).

Briefing Paper | Participatory Monitoring & Evaluation in the Green Climate Fund – And How Civil Society Can Engage

Monitoring and evaluation (M&E) has involved external experts or stakeholders measuring performance of a project or an activity against preset indicators, using standardized procedures and tools. However, with growing emphasis on participatory approaches towards development, there has been recognition that M&E should also be inclusive and consultative. Participation, defined as a process through which stakeholders influence and share control over development initiatives and the decisions and resources which affect them, could strengthen M&E. Participatory monitoring and evaluation (PM&E) is defined as a process through which stakeholders at various levels engage in monitoring and/or evaluating a particular project, programme, activity or policy, share control over their content, the process and the results, as well as engage in taking or identifying corrective actions.

The Green Climate Fund (GCF) requires that financed programmes, projects and activities are regularly monitored for impact, efficiency and effectiveness in line with rules and procedures established by the Board. The Fund encourages the use of participatory monitoring involving targeted stakeholders and calls on Accredited Entities (AEs) to include at the project/programme level participatory monitoring approaches. This translates into the expectation that they involve communities and local stakeholders, including civil society organizations (CSOs), at all stages of the project/programme cycle.

Innovative Finance Sources | A Complement to Strong Country Contributions for GCF Replenishment?

The Green Climate Fund (GCF) is the world’s largest dedicated fund for climate action. By the end of this year it will have distributed all USD 10.2 billion of its initial resource mobilisation to over 102 projects in 97 countries, and we hope have raised twice as much again in its first formal replenishment. It is vital that the GCF’s efforts to increase finance for climate change are successful.

Therefore it is essential that the GCF considers new, or ‘innovative’, sources of finance to help developing countries reduce their emissions, adapt to climate impacts, and to address the loss and damage when climate impacts go beyond adaptation capabilities. These new sources of finance must be genuinely new – not simply a replacement for commitments from rich countries, and it is essential that they not increase the debt burden on vulnerable countries.

We suggest that the GCF put in place a work plan to properly address truly new sources of finance beginning in 2020 that includes: establishing guiding principles, such as polluter pays and equity and fairness, and that new sources of finance should not increase indebtedness of vulnerable countries; exploring potential new sources of finance, with an emphasis on the taxation options included in this report, and identifying how much finance each could raise and for what purpose; credible plans of action for how to implement the most promising new sources detailing the steps that would need to be taken; and, identifying any additional architecture that would need to be put in place.

Indigenous Peoples Policy

Indigenous peoples are unique and a distinct stakeholder of the GCF. The rights of indigenous peoples are affirmed by international human rights instruments, including binding treaties and the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP). Indigenous peoples have invaluable and critical contributions to make to climate change mitigation and adaptation. Yet they are also facing serious threats to the realization of their rights from climate change actions.

This GCF Indigenous Peoples Policy (hereafter Policy) recognizes that indigenous peoples often have identities and aspirations that are distinct from mainstream groups in national societies and are disadvantaged by traditional models of mitigation, adaptation and development. In many instances, they are among the most economically marginalized and vulnerable segments of the population. The economic, social and legal status of indigenous peoples frequently limit their capacity to defend their rights to, and interests in, land, territories and natural and cultural resources, and may restrict their ability to participate in and benefit from development initiatives and climate change actions. In many cases, they do not receive equitable access to project benefits, or benefits are not devised or delivered in a form that isculturally appropriate, and they are not always adequately consulted about the design or implementation of activities that would profoundly affect their lives or communities.

This Policy will assist GCF in incorporating considerations related to indigenous peoples into its decision-making while working towards the goals of climate change mitigation and adaptation. The Policy allows GCF to anticipate and avoid any adverse impacts its activities may have on indigenous peoples’ rights, interests and well-being, and when avoidance is not possible to minimize, mitigate and/or compensate appropriately and equitably for such impacts, in a consistent way and to improve outcomes over time. These elements of the Policy will be integrated with other business processes and governance frameworks, particularly the ESMS, and will be utilized across the organization of GCF. The Policy will evolve and continue to mature as GCF operations develop.

CSO Update 3: Green Climate Fund Board Meeting 22

CSO Update on the 22nd GCF Board Meeting Day 3, prepared by the APMDD GCF Team.

CSO Update 2: Green Climate Fund Board Meeting 22

CSO Update on the 22nd GCF Board Meeting Day 2, prepared by the APMDD GCF Team.

CSO Update 1: Green Climate Fund Board Meeting 22

CSO Update on the 22nd GCF Board Meeting Day 1, prepared by the APMDD GCF Team.

Factsheet for Civil Society : Civil Society Engagement with the Green Climate Fund (English & French)

The Green Climate Fund (GCF) recognizes the importance of stakeholder input and participation in the design, development and implementation of its financed strategies and activities to reduce CO₂ emissions and support developing countries that are vulnerable to the effects of climate change. Despite some existing challenges, these stakeholders, including private sector actors, civil society organizations (CSOs), vulnerable groups, women and indigenous peoples, can engage in the GCF at various levels.

Prepared for use in particular by civil society, this factsheet provides clear information about which engagement opportunities exist at the national, regional and international levels for CSOs in the GCF. It enhances understanding on how to interact with the Fund’s Board, its Secretariat, and other relevant actors involved in the implementation of its financed activities. Furthermore, it describes which specific roles civil society can play in order to have a meaningful impact when they engage in planning, implementing, monitoring and evaluating activities, projects and programmes funded by the GCF. The publication ends by emphasizing a number of the Fund’s policies and guidelines, which are pertinent for civil society’s readiness.

The factsheet is published under the project “CSOs readiness to the GCF – focus Africa” jointly implemented by Germanwatch and CARE International with support from a consortium of African networks and civil society organizations. The project aims to support broader African civil society engagement in the critical early implementation phase of the GCF. Objectives include developing readiness materials which facilitate CSO understanding and engagement, supporting CSO engagement with the Fund in key African countries (with a focus on Ghana, Kenya, Malawi, Morocco, and Senegal), and sharing experiences at regional and global scales for expanded CSO engagement in Africa and beyond.

Fiche d’information sur l’Engagement de la société civile dans le Fonds vert pour le climat

Le Fonds vert pour le climat (FVC) reconnaît l’importance de la contribution et de la participation des parties prenantes à la conception, au développement et à la mise en œuvre de ses stratégies et des activités qu’il finance pour réduire les émissions de CO₂ et soutenir les pays en développement qui sont vulnérables aux effets du changement climatique. En dépit de difficultés existantes, ces parties prenantes, y compris les acteurs du secteur privé, les organisations de la société civile (OSC), les groupes vulnérables, les femmes et les peuples autochtones, peuvent participer aux activités du Fonds à différents niveaux.

Elaborée pour être particulièrement utilisée par la société civile, cette fiche d’information fournit des informations importantes sur les opportunités d’engagement avec le FVC qui existent aux niveaux local, national, régional et international pour les OSC. Il permet de mieux comprendre comment interagir avec le Conseil d’administration du Fonds, son Secrétariat indépendant et les autres acteurs qui participent à la mise en œuvre des activités financées par le Fonds. En outre, il décrit les rôles spécifiques que la société civile peut jouer pour avoir un impact significatif lorsqu’elle participe à la planification, à la mise en œuvre, au suivi et à l’évaluation des activités, projets et programmes financés par le Fonds. La publication souligne aussi un certain nombre de politiques et directives du FVC qui sont pertinentes pour une meilleure préparation de la société civile à son engagement.

Ces deux fiches d’information sont publiées dans le cadre du projet « Préparation des OSC au FVC – focus sur l’Afrique » conjointement mis en œuvre par Germanwatch et CARE International avec le soutien d’un consortium de réseaux et d’organisations africains de la société civile. Le projet vise à soutenir un engagement plus large de la société civile africaine dans la phase critique de mise en œuvre des activités financées par le Fonds. Les objectifs incluent l’élaboration de matériels de préparation qui facilitent la compréhension et l’engagement des organisations de la société civile (OSC) ; le soutien à l’engagement de ces acteurs au sein des activités du Fonds dans certains pays africains (notamment au Ghana, au Maroc, au Malawi, au Kenya et au Sénégal), et le partage des expériences aux niveaux régional et international, en vue d’un engagement accru des OSC en Afrique et au-delà.

Factsheet for Civil Society : Green Climate Fund Readiness and Preparatory Support Programme (English & French)

Green Climate Fund Readiness and Preparatory Support Programme – a Factsheet for Civil Society

Developing countries that are vulnerable to the effects of climate change and/or plan activities to reduce CO₂ emissions can access resources from the Green Climate Fund (GCF). The Fund has established the Readiness and Preparatory Support Programme which is meant to promote country ownership. Since its operationalization in 2014, the Programme has been providing early support activities to enhance ownership and enable access to the GCF resources.

This factsheet is made for civil society and aims to enhance their understanding of the GCF’s Readiness and Preparatory Support Programme. It provides a clear explanation of which activities are supported, how much funding is available and how to access these resources in order to strengthen countries’ engagement with the Fund as well as maximize the impacts of funded projects or programmes locally.

The factsheet is published under the project “Civil Society Organizations readiness to the Green Climate Fund – focus Africa” jointly implemented by Germanwatch and CARE International with support from a consortium of African networks and civil society organizations. The project aims to support broader African civil society engagement in the critical early implementation phase of the GCF. Objectives include developing readiness materials which facilitate CSOs understanding and engagement; supporting CSOs engagement with the Fund in key African countries (with a focus on Ghana, Kenya, Morocco, Malawi and Senegal), and sharing experiences at regional and global scales for expanded CSOs engagement in Africa and beyond.

Fiche d’information sur le Programme de préparation et de soutien préparatoire du Fonds vert pour le climat

Les pays en développement qui sont vulnérables aux effets du changement climatique et/ou qui conçoivent des activités visant la réduction des émissions de CO₂ peuvent accéder aux ressources financières du Fonds vert pour le climat (FVC). Le Fonds a établi le Programme de préparation et de soutien préparatoire (Readiness Programme) qui vise à promouvoir l’appropriation par les pays. Depuis l’opérationnalisation du Fonds en 2014, le Programme fournit une aide aux activités visant à améliorer l’appropriation et permettre un accès aux ressources du FVC.

Cette fiche d’information, préparée en particulier pour être utilisée par la société civile, vise à améliorer la compréhension du Programme de préparation et de soutien préparatoire du Fonds vert pour le climat. Elle explique clairement quelles activités sont financées, dans quelle mesure ce financement est disponible et comment accéder à ces ressources afin de renforcer la participation des pays en développement au Fonds et de maximiser l’impact des projets ou programmes financés par celui-ci au niveau local, national et régional.

Case Study (Ghana): Why Government granted us GCF observer rights

Being at the table when governments prepare decisions in relation to how they approach the Green Climate Fund (GCF) domestically is important for civil society to play a meaningful role as dialogue partner. As part of a multi-country project advancing civil society readiness to the GCF with a particular focus on Africa, civil society organisations in Ghana have been actively engaging in the national debates on the GCF.

In 2017, the SDG13 platform demanded from Government that CSOs be granted observer rights in the country’s cross-ministerial Technical Advisory Committee. Eventually, Government acceded to our demands – and more. But why did we succeed?

Green Climate Fund: The Basics

The impacts of climate change are already being felt by many millions of people and communities around the world – but the burden weighs most heavily on the poor and marginalised in developing countries.

That’s why 195 countries came together to create the Green Climate Fund (GCF) under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). The GCF is expected to play a central role in financing efforts to combat climate change (mitigation) and to help eveloping countries cope with its effects (adaptation).

The GCF agreed on eight initial funding proposals in November 2015, following a five year process to establish the Fund. It has been promised US$10.3billion over its first four years of operation, mostly from developed countries, but only US$6.7 billion has actually been legally committed to the GCF to date. The USA is the most prominent laggard and has yet to deliver any of its US$3 billion pledge.

Green Climate Fund: The Private Sector

The private sector – in particular, the role of transnational corporations and financiers – has featured prominently in discussions on the Green Climate Fund (GCF). As in other areas of climate finance, this partly reflects the lack of public money that developed untries provide to help developing countries to take climate action.

Green Climate Fund: In Your Country

Green Climate Fund (GCF) projects and programmes can only take place in countries where approval has been given by a National Designated Authority (NDA) or “focal point,” usually housed within a government ministry (a full list is here: bit.ly/1RY9w1W).

NDAs and focal points are expected to engage in a process of multi-stakeholder engagement before issuing a “no objection” letter approving a project, although it remains to be seen if this will happen in practice. Contacting an NDA or focal point is a good starting
point for finding out about activities that the GCF is considering funding in your area.

Non-governmental organizations may have further information on GCF activities, notably through www.gcfwatch.org.

It is also worth checking the official GCF website (www.greenclimate.fund), which should list projects and programmes three weeks in dvance of their approval by the Fund’s Board.

Green Climate Fund: How Fund is Decided

There are no restrictions on whom or what kind of organization can come up with an idea for a Green Climate Fund (GCF) funding proposal. Activities can be proposed by organizations based in developed or developing countries, but only an approved GCF partner can actually submit a proposal. There are 20 of these “accredited entities” so far (see bit.ly/1ToYWmz), ranging from multilateral banks to government ministries, with dozens more currently considering accreditation. Other organizations must work with accredited entities to develop their proposals. For example, an unaccredited government ministry may work with a GCFaccredited multilateral development agency to develop a proposal, or an unaccredited civil society organization or cooperative may work with a GCF-accredited commercial bank.

Green Climate Fund: Right and Equity

The safeguard policies of financial institutions are supposed to ensure that they do not fund activities that harm people and the environment.

The GCF is using the International Finance Corporation’s Environmental and Social Performance Standards on an interim basis. These provide benchmarks covering eight topics: 1) the assessment and management of environmental and social risks and impacts; 2) labour and working conditions; 3) resource efficiency and pollution prevention; 4) community health, safety, and security; 5) land acquisition and involuntary resettlement; 6) biodiversity conservation and sustainable management of living natural resources; 7) ndigenous Peoples; and 8) cultural heritage.

The GCF will develop its own “best practice” safeguards by 2018 through a multi-stakeholder process.

Green Climate Fund: Right and Equity

The safeguard policies of financial institutions are supposed to ensure that they do not fund activities that harm people and the environment.

The GCF is using the International Finance Corporation’s Environmental and Social Performance Standards on an interim basis. These provide benchmarks covering eight topics: 1) the assessment and management of environmental and social risks and impacts; 2) labour and working conditions; 3) resource efficiency and pollution prevention; 4) community health, safety, and security; 5) land acquisition and involuntary resettlement; 6) biodiversity conservation and sustainable management of living natural resources; 7) ndigenous Peoples; and 8) cultural heritage.

The GCF will develop its own “best practice” safeguards by 2018 through a multi-stakeholder process.

Definition of Terms
Definition of Terms
The Green Climate Fund (GCF) is a new global fund created to support the efforts of developing countries to respond to the challenge of climate change. GCF helps developing countries limit or reduce their greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and adapt to climate change. It seeks to promote a paradigm shift to low-emission and climate-resilient development, taking into account the needs of nations that are particularly vulnerable to climate change impacts. (Source: Green Climate Fund)
  • For an in-depth definition of the terms used in GCF, click here.
Menu